Summer at Oakland Feather River Camp

Summer at Oakland Feather River Camp

This summer, our Music Integration Director, Ami Molinelli, spent time at Oakland Feather River Camp bringing music to kids in the middle of the California wilderness.. The following is an account of the camp and it’s music teachers from Alexa Weber Morales.  It’s hard to stay inside after a week of living outdoors, swimming in creeks and mountain lakes, making music and dancing, reading, hiking, socializing and, before bed, seeing the Milky Way snaking across the star-spattered sky. That’s my life at Oakland Feather River Camp (http://featherrivercamp.com), where I’ve taught various classes and been the artist in residence during music week for the past 12 years. It’s a low-key family atmosphere, rustic and relaxing. It’s also kid heaven. They get dirty, learn to swim, play ping pong, board games and “Sardines”, and wholly entertain themselves away from electronic devices. Classes include: Group Ensemble, Beginning Ukelele, Beginning Brazilian Percussion, Salsa/Samba Aerobics, Voice Technique and Recycled Rhythm. I share vocal technique, lead early morning salsa aerobics, put together the final show lineup, and rehearse with the impromptu ensembles that form throughout the week. Joining me for the last several years are percussionist Ami Molinelli and guitarist Brian Moran. Read on for more about the teachers… AMI MOLINELLI – Brazilian percussion Ami Molinelli is a professional percussionist and educator specializing in Brazilian and Latin percussion, especially the pandeiro.  She is the co-leader of the Brazilian choro and jazz ensemble, Grupo Falso Baiano. Ami received her MFA from the California Institute of the Arts and has studied at the Universidade Federal da Bahia in Salvador.  She has studied with master percussionists Michael Spiro, John Bergamo, Randy Gloss, and Guello to name a few. As...
Free Instrument Petting Zoo on a Rooftop Park!

Free Instrument Petting Zoo on a Rooftop Park!

  What? Is it Back to School again already? That’s right! For many Bay Area schools, students begin to head back in mid-August. Even though summer is starting to wind down, however, that doesn’t mean summer fun has ended for good! Don’t miss a FREE Instrument Petting Zoo on Saturday, August 11th at the Salesforce Park Grand Opening! Join us at the park’s children’s area for three hours of musical fun on the gorgeous rooftop park in downtown San Francisco. MUST has teamed up with the folks at Salesforce Park in downtown San Francisco for a month of Saturday music events. We kick off the Fall season with an Instrument Petting Zoo at the Salesforce Park Grand Opening on Saturday, August 11th, and continue the fun every Saturday through August with a MUST teaching artist leading songs on the rooftop park. What’s an Instrument Petting Zoo? It’s an opportunity for kids of all ages to explore new instruments and make some music outside. Our staff offers many instruments, including guitar, keyboard, accordion, tambourine, xylophone, castanets, bells, and many other percussion instruments. So come out and join us in downtown San Francisco for music and fun in the sun (or maybe in the...

Happy Uncommon Instrument Awareness Day!

Do you know what a hydraulophone is? How about a bladderpipe? You’ve heard of the sousaphone, but what about the zeusaphone? July 31 is Uncommon Musical Instrument Awareness Day, a day to celebrate odd, rare, experimental, and uncommon musical instruments. We’ve chosen three unusual instruments to share with you today, ranging from the electrifying to the stomach-turning to the nutritious. Next time you think about picking up a new instrument, consider one of these: Zeusaphone The zuesaphone is a “singing” Tesla coil, a kind of transformer circuit. Zuesaphones use electricity to produce a frequency that can then be turned into music, much like a theremin. The name is a combination of “sousaphone” and “Zeus”, the Greek god who hurls lightning at his enemies. The zuesaphone makes a buzzy, synth-like noise that sounds like it’s straight out of science fiction.   Bladderpipe The bladderpipe is a very old instrument dating to the middle ages. It is similar to a bagpipe, but smaller and somewhat more simplified. No bladder pipes have survived from the Middle Ages or from the Renaissance. However, they are pictured in various historical manuscripts. The “cap”, or bag, of the bladderpipe was make from animal bladders, which the musician filled with air in order to play.   The Vegetable Orchestra The Vegetable Orchestra is an Austrian musical group who use instruments made entirely from fresh vegetables. Their instruments, which are all of their own invention, include carrot recorders, clappers made from eggplant, trumpets made from zucchini, and numerous others, which are amplified with the use of special microphones. The instruments are made from scratch just one hour prior to each performance using the freshest vegetables available, then all ninety pounds of vegetables...
Making Music in the Garden, Part 3

Making Music in the Garden, Part 3

This post is a continuation of a lesson from June called Making Music in the Garden: A Summertime Lesson in Music Integration. View part 1 and part 2 here. How do you think nature and music are connected? Peas don’t just come from the frozen section in the groceries store, and music isn’t just for professionals on the radio. In the hustle and bustle of modern life, it is easy to forget where the things we enjoy come from, and how we can take part in bringing these things to life. Do you, or I, or anyone know how oats, peas, beans, and melodies grow? We’re big into music integration at Music in Schools Today. Even though school is out and music programs are on a brief hiatus, it’s still important to integrate music into children’s everyday lives. Here is a taste of one of our programs, Nature of Music. This lesson integrates music into learning about nature in the garden, by planting seeds that will grow into delicious snacks in just a few weeks time. It’s a good way to get kids outside learning about the world around them, and about science and music. Try it this summer! Get outside, make some music, and learn something! In our last lesson, we planted pea plants and learned about the parts of a plant and what they do through singing the song Roots, Stems, Leaves. In this lesson, we will build on that knowledge, and introduce new information about how to take care of our pea plants! You will need: Xylophones, drums, or other percussion instruments The song Decomposition The Carrot Seed By Ruth...
Country Music Stars Encourage music education in schools!

Country Music Stars Encourage music education in schools!

Country music can be a polarizing genre–it seems you either love it or hate it. But if there’s one thing that both fans and opponents of country music can agree on, it seems, it’s the importance of music education. The Country Music Awards and the Country Music Festival were earlier this month, and when people weren’t talking about who won and who was headlining, they were talking about how music education helped them get their start in the industry. Headliner Keith Urban shared his experiences with music education as a child: “It was very important for me. I was really fortunate to go to a public school that happened to have a music room and a music teacher and I just thought that was the basic standard given in every situation, but you are seeing it more and more where they do away with that where they are cutting cost and it’s a big problem because it’s not some sort of fringe curriculum thing that you can just discard you know with so many kids who are musically gifted. That is the way in which they find their voice and self-esteem and identity, and everything is in that, so to do away with that is very very destructive for a lot of kids.” Urban, who grew up and went to school in Austrailia, shares perhaps a more global view of this issue. Austrailia’s school system is certainly different from those in the United States, however, they face many of the same problems as schools in the US when it comes to music education. 63 percent of schools in Austrailia offered no music instruction and only 23 percent had specialist...

The World Cup Brings the Music!

The World Cup is winding down again, and with that comes time for reflection on this year’s World Cup and previous years’. What better way to do so than to look back at the songs that defined World Cups of years past? For 2018, the official song was Live it Up by Nicky Jam, ft Will Smith and Era Istrefi. It’s a lively song reminiscent of Latin and Reggeaton cross-over hits from recent years such as Despacito and any number of Daddy Yankee or J Balvin songs. Live it Up has a rap interlude courtesy of Will Smith, perhaps hitting on the 90s nostalgia sweeping the Western world in 2018. But what about the first ever World Cup Song? That title goes to El Rock del Mundial by Los Ramblers, back in 1962. El Rock del Mundial is an Elvis-esque rock-and-roll song sung in Spanish with jazzy horn and guitar riffs throughout. The title roughly translates to “World Rock”, and was an early attempt at a unifying theme to bring multiple countries and teams together. The second World Cup Song was maybe a little too on-the-nose: World Cup Willie seems bizarre to modern ears, reminiscent of novelty songs of the late 1960s or perhaps the Sergent Pepper-era Beatles. Though perhaps the oddest thing is that this song may be making a comeback! According to an article on scotsman.com, streaming service Deezer has chosen the song to be England’s “secret weapon” in the 2018 World Cup. According to the article, Deezer has urged listeners to get behind the English team by “encouraging Brits to sing along to Lonnie Donegan’s World Cup Willie, the soundtrack to England’s win in 1966. A survey of 1,000...

Do you like American music?

Do you like American music? We like all kinds of music, But I like American music best. -“American Music”, The Violent Femmes Happy Independence Day! As you and family are barbequing, toasting marshmallows, and watching fireworks, no doubt you will also be listening to music–perhaps even American music. As a melting pot of many nationalities and backgrounds, American music is unique and quite interesting! Join us for a breif history of American music–and listen along! 1776- British soldiers sing “Yankee Doodle” to mock colonists, and Americans adopt it as their own tune. “Johnny’s Gone for a Soldier,” an adaptation of Irish folk tune, gains popularity in the newly formed United States.   1815- Francis Scott Key writes the poem The Defense of Fort McHenry, which appears in The Baltimore Patriot newspaper. One year later he puts the poem to the music of popular British song, To Anacreon in Heaven, and publishes The Star-Spangled Banner.   1850- Col. Sandford C. Faulkner believed to write music and words to The Arkansas Traveler, a song about a country fiddler, popular in the Ohio River Valley. The song is traditionally known to have had several versions of lyrics, which are much older than the copyrighted song.   1861-Julia Ward Howe writes a poem for Atlantic Monthly, “Battle Hymn of the Republic,” based on the hymn, “John Brown’s Body”; William Steffe later writes music to create popular Civil War song. Staying at the Willard Hotel in Washington on the night of November 18, 1861, Howe awoke with the words of the song in her mind and in near darkness wrote the verses to the “Battle Hymn of the Republic”. Of the writing of the lyrics, Howe remembered: I...

Making Music in the Garden, Part 2

This post is a continuation of a lesson from June called Making Music in the Garden: A Summertime Lesson in Music Integration. How do you think nature and music are connected? Peas don’t just come from the frozen section in the groceries store, and music isn’t just for professionals on the radio. In the hustle and bustle of modern life, it is easy to forget where the things we enjoy come from, and how we can take part in bringing these things to life. Do you, or I, or anyone know how oats, peas, beans, and melodies grow? We’re big into music integration at Music in Schools Today. Even though school is out and music programs are on a brief hiatus, it’s still important to integrate music into children’s everyday lives. Here is a taste of one of our programs, Nature of Music. This lesson integrates music into learning about nature in the garden, by planting seeds that will grow into delicious snacks in just a few weeks time. It’s a good way to get kids outside learning about the world around them, and about science and music. Try it this summer! Get outside, make some music, and learn something! In our last lesson, we planted pea plants and learned about how plants grow and are tended through singing the song “Oats, Peas, Beans, and Barley Grow”. In this lesson, we will build on that knowledge, and introduce new information about how our pea plants are growing! You will need: Picture of pea plant, labeled with plant parts Large paper with words “Roots, Stems, Leaves, Flowers, Fruits, Seeds” Activity: Review the previous...

June 21st is Make Music Day!

Celebrate summer by making music! Launched in 1982 in France as the Fête de la Musique, Make Music Day is now held on the same day in more than 120 countries. Completely different from a typical music festival, Make Music is open to anyone who wants to take part. Every kind of musician — young and old, amateur and professional, of every musical persuasion — pours onto streets, parks, plazas, and porches to share their music with friends, neighbors, and strangers. Make Music Day is performed by anyone and enjoyed by everyone. Whether you are a professional musician or just musically curious there are multiple ways to participate. Locally, Make Music Day is celebrated in Davis and in San Jose. Venues all over participating cities will have performances and hands-on musical activities for you to attend. There are Play-Along events all over San Jose: harmonica lessons, an“orchestral adventure”, and kids events. In Davis, you can try your hand at bucket-drumming, attend a musician meet-up, or try your hand at music trivia! Even if you can’t attend an official event, you can participate at home: Call up your friends for a jam session. Take a break from work for a harmonica lesson. Have a kazoo parade around your neighborhood park. Get your choir group to create a new San Jose theme song. Get creative. Venues can be anywhere. Performers can be anyone. Most importantly, get out there and make music!   ...

We got the grant!

It’s a BIG day in the MUST office, because we got the grant! Grants totaling $16,376,475 have been awarded to nonprofit organizations and units of government across California this week by the California Arts Council, and Music in Schools Today is one of the organizations receiving support for programs. “To show support for these organizations-the ones who inspire and make those crucial connections to creativity and culture within our communities-it’s a confirmation of our faith in and gratitude for that vision. This is without a doubt the most fulfilling aspect of our work as Council Members each year, to recognize those doing real, organic work to make a difference for the people of California.” Music in Schools Today has received TWO grants for the 2018-2019 year: Organizational Development: The Organizational Development program (formerly the Consulting strand of the Professional Development and Consulting program) builds nonprofit arts organizations’ capacity for success through small grants to support consulting services, and Artists in Schools: The Arts Education: Artists in Schools program supports projects that integrate community arts resources-local artists and nonprofit arts organizations-into comprehensive, standards-based arts-learning for PreK-12 students during the school day. Applicants’ projects must take place during regular school hours at the school site, and should address the unique circumstances of the school environment. Thanks to these grants, MUST is able to continue providing exceptional music education in the Bay Area, especially with regard to our Music First! music and literacy program! “Our state is the most creative state in the country, by far. There’s no shortage to the hunger for arts and culture experiences. Governor Brown and our legislators have...