Do you like American music?

Do you like American music? We like all kinds of music, But I like American music best. -“American Music”, The Violent Femmes Happy Independence Day! As you and family are barbequing, toasting marshmallows, and watching fireworks, no doubt you will also be listening to music–perhaps even American music. As a melting pot of many nationalities and backgrounds, American music is unique and quite interesting! Join us for a breif history of American music–and listen along! 1776- British soldiers sing “Yankee Doodle” to mock colonists, and Americans adopt it as their own tune. “Johnny’s Gone for a Soldier,” an adaptation of Irish folk tune, gains popularity in the newly formed United States.   1815- Francis Scott Key writes the poem The Defense of Fort McHenry, which appears in The Baltimore Patriot newspaper. One year later he puts the poem to the music of popular British song, To Anacreon in Heaven, and publishes The Star-Spangled Banner.   1850- Col. Sandford C. Faulkner believed to write music and words to The Arkansas Traveler, a song about a country fiddler, popular in the Ohio River Valley. The song is traditionally known to have had several versions of lyrics, which are much older than the copyrighted song.   1861-Julia Ward Howe writes a poem for Atlantic Monthly, “Battle Hymn of the Republic,” based on the hymn, “John Brown’s Body”; William Steffe later writes music to create popular Civil War song. Staying at the Willard Hotel in Washington on the night of November 18, 1861, Howe awoke with the words of the song in her mind and in near darkness wrote the verses to the “Battle Hymn of the Republic”. Of the writing of the lyrics, Howe remembered: I...

Making Music in the Garden, Part 2

This post is a continuation of a lesson from June called Making Music in the Garden: A Summertime Lesson in Music Integration. How do you think nature and music are connected? Peas don’t just come from the frozen section in the groceries store, and music isn’t just for professionals on the radio. In the hustle and bustle of modern life, it is easy to forget where the things we enjoy come from, and how we can take part in bringing these things to life. Do you, or I, or anyone know how oats, peas, beans, and melodies grow? We’re big into music integration at Music in Schools Today. Even though school is out and music programs are on a brief hiatus, it’s still important to integrate music into children’s everyday lives. Here is a taste of one of our programs, Nature of Music. This lesson integrates music into learning about nature in the garden, by planting seeds that will grow into delicious snacks in just a few weeks time. It’s a good way to get kids outside learning about the world around them, and about science and music. Try it this summer! Get outside, make some music, and learn something! In our last lesson, we planted pea plants and learned about how plants grow and are tended through singing the song “Oats, Peas, Beans, and Barley Grow”. In this lesson, we will build on that knowledge, and introduce new information about how our pea plants are growing! You will need: Picture of pea plant, labeled with plant parts Large paper with words “Roots, Stems, Leaves, Flowers, Fruits, Seeds” Activity: Review the previous...

June 21st is Make Music Day!

Celebrate summer by making music! Launched in 1982 in France as the Fête de la Musique, Make Music Day is now held on the same day in more than 120 countries. Completely different from a typical music festival, Make Music is open to anyone who wants to take part. Every kind of musician — young and old, amateur and professional, of every musical persuasion — pours onto streets, parks, plazas, and porches to share their music with friends, neighbors, and strangers. Make Music Day is performed by anyone and enjoyed by everyone. Whether you are a professional musician or just musically curious there are multiple ways to participate. Locally, Make Music Day is celebrated in Davis and in San Jose. Venues all over participating cities will have performances and hands-on musical activities for you to attend. There are Play-Along events all over San Jose: harmonica lessons, an“orchestral adventure”, and kids events. In Davis, you can try your hand at bucket-drumming, attend a musician meet-up, or try your hand at music trivia! Even if you can’t attend an official event, you can participate at home: Call up your friends for a jam session. Take a break from work for a harmonica lesson. Have a kazoo parade around your neighborhood park. Get your choir group to create a new San Jose theme song. Get creative. Venues can be anywhere. Performers can be anyone. Most importantly, get out there and make music!      Please follow and like...

We got the grant!

It’s a BIG day in the MUST office, because we got the grant! Grants totaling $16,376,475 have been awarded to nonprofit organizations and units of government across California this week by the California Arts Council, and Music in Schools Today is one of the organizations receiving support for programs. “To show support for these organizations-the ones who inspire and make those crucial connections to creativity and culture within our communities-it’s a confirmation of our faith in and gratitude for that vision. This is without a doubt the most fulfilling aspect of our work as Council Members each year, to recognize those doing real, organic work to make a difference for the people of California.” Music in Schools Today has received TWO grants for the 2018-2019 year: Organizational Development: The Organizational Development program (formerly the Consulting strand of the Professional Development and Consulting program) builds nonprofit arts organizations’ capacity for success through small grants to support consulting services, and Artists in Schools: The Arts Education: Artists in Schools program supports projects that integrate community arts resources-local artists and nonprofit arts organizations-into comprehensive, standards-based arts-learning for PreK-12 students during the school day. Applicants’ projects must take place during regular school hours at the school site, and should address the unique circumstances of the school environment. Thanks to these grants, MUST is able to continue providing exceptional music education in the Bay Area, especially with regard to our Music First! music and literacy program! “Our state is the most creative state in the country, by far. There’s no shortage to the hunger for arts and culture experiences. Governor Brown and our legislators have...

Making Music in the Garden: A Summertime Lesson in Music Integration

How do you think nature and music are connected?   Peas don’t just come from the frozen section in the groceries store, and music isn’t just for professionals on the radio. In the hustle and bustle of modern life, it is easy to forget where the things we enjoy come from, and how we can take part in bringing these things to life. Do you, or I, or anyone know how oats, peas, beans, and melodies grow? We’re big into music integration at Music in Schools Today. Even though school is out and music programs are on a brief hiatus, it’s still important to integrate music into children’s everyday lives. Here is a taste of one of our programs, Nature of Music. This lesson integrates music into learning about nature in the garden, by planting seeds that will grow into delicious snacks in just a few weeks time. It’s a good way to get kids outside learning about the world around them, and about science and music. Try it this summer! Get outside, make some music, and learn something! You will need: Six pea seeds per child Quart yogurt containers with a hole in the bottom to allow for drainage Potting soil Popsicle sticks Permanent markers Journals Pens or pencils Activity: Hand out pens or pencils and introduce journals. Have children write their names on their journals. Ask the children to write in their journals (or help them write their answers): “How do you think nature and music are connected?” Name 3 steps you need to take to grow a plant from seed? Draw what a pea looks like as...