Hats off to Teaching Artists!

Hats off to Teaching Artists!

Today, our MUST Teaching Artists have their first days of school in San Lorenzo! Some are returning to the classroom for the umpteenth time, and some are stepping into their role as teacher for the first time ever.  Teaching is not an easy job, whether it’s eight hours in a classroom or 60 minutes after school. But it’s because of the dedication and love that our teaching artists put into their work that kids in the Bay Area have the opportunity to learn Piano, Guitar, Modern Salsa Dance, Comic Book Arts, and many more fun and invaluable skills. Teachers are where the pedal of arts education meets the metal of the classroom. They are the ones who inspire, motivate, and care for kids in the classroom. The task can seem daunting, and at times it can be a heavy burden, but to see the look on a child’s face when a lesson finally “clicks” makes it all worth it. Teaching Artists help students move mountains, so they can continue to do so themselves for the rest of their creative lives. Author John Steinbeck wrote: “I have come to believe that a great teacher is a great artist and that there are as few as there are any other great artists. It might even be the greatest of the arts since the medium is the human mind and spirit.” These individuals who spend their lives molding the mind and freeing the spirit are the heart of music education. They are the sole reason we can continue to reach more and more students every year. It is thanks to their expertise, hard...
Four BIG ways to support the arts and humanities this month.

Four BIG ways to support the arts and humanities this month.

Ah, October. Just the word conjures up images of pumpkins, warm sweaters, apple cider, Halloween, and cozying up by a bonfire. But it should also evoke thoughts of art, music, poetry, literature, and dance because October is National Arts and Humanities Month! National Arts & Humanities Month was established in 1993 and is celebrated every October in the United States. It was initiated to encourage Americans to explore new facets of the arts and humanities in their lives, and to begin a lifelong habit of participation in the arts and humanities. It has become the nation’s largest collective annual celebration of the arts. National Arts and Humanities Month’s four goals are: FOCUSING on the arts at local, state, and national levels ENCOURAGING individuals and organizations to participate in the arts ALLOWING governments and businesses to show their support of the arts RAISING public awareness about the role the arts and humanities play in our communities and lives Here are some ways to celebrate this month! Get your family, friends, co-workers, and neighbors in on celebrating the humanities with you: Focus on the arts at a local level by becoming a teaching artist or docent, visiting a museum or independent bookstore, attending your local Literature Week, visiting the theatre, or volunteering at your local library. Encourage your family and friends to participate in the arts by hosting an art night at home, going to see an outdoor concert, learning a new instrument or a new art technique. Allow your government and local businesses to support the arts by reviewing your local and state propositions before voting this November! Support local arts advocacy groups with a donation or by volunteering for...
Change lives: become a MUST Teaching Artist!

Change lives: become a MUST Teaching Artist!

MUST is looking for enthusiastic artists to teach students in the East Bay! Could you be who we’re looking for? Read on to find out more! We are looking for Teaching Artists to teach singing, dance, comic book making, and fashion design. MUST hires Teaching Artists to teach dozens of art forms in an after-school setting for the San Lorenzo Unified School District’s elementary and middle schools. Teaching Artists use their own curriculum and bring their expertise in their art form to their teaching. Teaching Artists are part of a team of 26 teaching artists providing all schools in San Lorenzo with access to the arts. RESIDENCY DETAILS: Dates: October 16, 2018, to mid-Jan 2019Days: Tuesdays & ThursdaysTime: 2:40 – 3:40 (Elementary); 3:05 – 4:05 (Middle)Location: San LorenzoPay is: $75 per hr for 16 sessions over an eight-week period 1) One or more years experience teaching children either as a volunteer or paid position.2) Expertise in their art form.3) Kind, enthusiastic and encouraging attitude toward students. 4) All new hires must clear a background check (for this school district) and must have a clear TB test within the last 4 years. Are you interested? Know someone who might be? Email info@mustcreate.org to apply by October 11th 2018.  Interested in learning more about what it’s like to be a teaching artist? Here’s what last year’s MUST TAs had to say: “I really enjoyed showing and teaching these students about the different uses of all the mediums were utilized this semester. Having answers to their infinite questions about what everything is used for or how to create or draw something new is...
28 Ways to “Keep Kids Creative” this week!

28 Ways to “Keep Kids Creative” this week!

In honor of National Keep Kids Creative Week (September 24-28), we’ve come up with 28 ways to keep kids creative! Keep Kids Creative Week was founded in 2003 by Bruce Van Patter with the goal of encouraging children to not lose their creative spark as they grow older. According to the founder, the week is “time set aside to encourage kids to grab hold of their innate creativity and never let go!” He offers even more ways to celebrate the holiday on his website. From conducting a science experiment to composing a song, you won’t run out of ideas for exercising your creativity this week. Which one will be your favorite? 1. Designate a space for creating. 2. Remember that mistakes are good! 3. Allow for “free time” to create in your schedule. 4. Embrace a good mess–the next time your child asks to paint or wants to get everything out of a supply bin, make room for it!   5. Discuss art, music, drama, theatre, movies, and creativity as a family. 6. Build a fort! 7. Conduct a science experiment. 8. Make something out of a mundane object, like a tissue box or a soup can. 9. Visit a museum! 10. Give children the opportunity to express “divergent thought.” Create safe spaces for experimentation and asking questions. 11. Plant a garden (look for tips on how to incorporate music in the garden here). 12. Go to the library and collect books on crafts, music, and science! 13. Cultivate creative critical thinking through mind-mapping, puzzles, and creative problem-solving. 14. Draw something new! 15. Learn a new song, or make one...
4 Easy Ways Parents Can Support Music Education

4 Easy Ways Parents Can Support Music Education

This week’s blog post is by guest blogger Scott Jenkins. Scott is Editor at architypes.net and a writer. You can see more from him on Twitter at @scottjenkins. Thanks, Scott!  With more and more school districts cutting funding to art classes, the music classes that your child needs and loves could be at risk. And even if your child’s music classes aren’t at risk, do you know how to encourage your child to nurture their musical education? Fortunately, there are some easy ways to do just that. Here’s how parents can support their children’s music education at home and at school. Show up One of the most important things a parent can do for their child’s musical education is to show up to the concerts, recitals, and musical events. Show your support for your child and the music classes that are inspiring them by attending these events and even encouraging the school to host more of them. Performing in front of an audience builds confidence, encourages dedication to their instrument, and helps your child learn about self-control and hard work. Reward their efforts by being there and showing that you care about their musical education. Encourage practice, don’t force it Well-meaning parents can destroy a child’s love of music by punishing them for not practicing often enough. Instead of punishing your child for not practicing, work on encouraging them to want to improve. Support their practice times by offering the space and an ear, if needed, so they can get feedback. Even if you don’t know the first thing about music, you can still lend moral support and become your child’s...